Monticello Stuff on Sale

February 14, 2011

Monticello is hosting a veritable fire sale of cool stuff. Carry forth to see some of what they are offering…

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Monticello Calender and Seeds

January 26, 2011

For those who like the Maestro of Monticello’s home residence and one or more of the following : A) not paying full price; B) Hanging pictures of historical homes on your wall; C) growing things; D) growing things that TJ himself did – read on!

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TJ’s Garden: Native Columbine

June 28, 2010

Mr. Jefferson’s observant son-in-law spotted this plant at Monticello in 1791.

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The Mythical Botanic Garden at UVA

May 23, 2009

http://www.flickr.com/photos/metaxin/A graduate student in Architectural History at Mr. Jefferson’s University will research the mythicial botanic garden Thomas Jefferson dreamed up for the school.

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Things Named Jefferson: The Plant Edition

February 20, 2009

Jeffersonia diphylla or Twinleaf is an uncommon spring flower named after the “Titan of Tuckahoe” in 1792 by botonist Benjamin Smith Barton, a contemporary of TJ, and fellow member of the American Philosophical Society.

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TJ Apple of the Month: Virginia Crab

December 10, 2008
Common crabapples

Common crabapples

{This is the third post in a series on Thomas Jefferson’s favorite foods. For part I click here. For part II, click here.}

Jefferson was a genius in most everything he did, but he was inherently a practical one. His studies informed his practice of law early in his career; his knowledge of botany came into practice in the gardens of Monticello; his appreciation of architecture (namely Palladio) manifested into Monticello, Poplar Forest, and several other buildings; his love of European art adorned the walls of his home; the French cuisine he feasted upon came back with him and its recipes introduced to a young America; his passion for math meant his calculations for the construction of Monticello was to the 6th or 7th decimal point!

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TJ Apple of the Month: Esopus Spitzenburg

October 17, 2008
Not Spitenburgs

Not Spitzenburgs

Sounding like a prehistoric, miniature horse (that would be Eohippus to the dinosaur-savvy), Esopus Spitzenburg was considered one of TJ’s four favorites. Like the mighty A.P., Esopus Spitzenburg was a dessert fruit. Despite cultivating less than two dozen trees, Monticello’s most famous Pomologist, apparently journalled (read: blogging in pre-Internet times) more about Esopus Spitzenburg than any other kind.

Source: The Twinleaf Journal

Photo courtesy of foodista


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